Monday, October 31, 2011

QUEEN ELIZABETH - I WAS BORN IN THE BLOODLINE OF CHRIST

MY MIDDLE NAME IS ELIZABETH

FROM MY FAMILY BLOODLINE I AM QUEEN OF THIS COUNTRY

MY FAMILY FOUNDED AMERICA SEVERAL YEARS AGO

GREAT GRANDMOTHER WAS A KNOWN QUEEN IN AMERICA AND UNTIL THERE WAS A SERIOUS MURDER OF A CITIZEN OF THE UNITED STATES AND KIDNAPPING A CHILD WHO SURVIVED THE MURDER.  PRIOR MY FAMILY WAS IN THE PUBLIC EYE.  BECAUSE OF THE MURDER WHICH UNFORTUNATELY WAS A SATANIC RELATED MURDER THAT HELP WITH THE PRODUCTION OF THE SATANIC BIBLE AND SET IN NEW RULES OF THE CULT BUT THE REAL PURPOSE OF THIS WAS TO KIDNAP AND KILL CHILDREN.  THESE PEOPLE ALSO WANTED TO KEEP CHILDREN IN A PLACE WHERE NO ONE COULD FIND THEM BECAUSE THESE PEOPLE HAD A SERIOUS PROBLEM WITH CHILD MOLESTATION.

MY CALLING IS PROTECTION OF PEOPLE

MY WORK AS A PROPHETESS HAS EFFECTED EVERYONE GLOBALLY BECAUSE OF POWERFUL PRAYERS

MY FAMILY IS FROM THE ROYAL BLOODLINE OF CHRIST
THIS IS SOME INFORMATION TO HELP YOU UNDERSTAND THINGS



MY FAMILY IS IN THE BLOODLINE OF CHRIST ON MY FATHER SIDE




I was born in the bloodline of Christ.  Christ was born at this point over 2000 years ago and I was born in 1966.  My great grandmother and grand father taught me a lot about who were my ancestors and I will start with some names you may be familiar with such as Marilyn Monroe and her sister Dorothy Dandridge.  Others I would like to mention who have a history of maintaining through ownership the United States and France.  We can start with Queen Elizabeth I and I'm going back to Christ and move forward to our current time so people will have an idea as to how things are normally ran in this world. 
I was also born in a royal family and my family started like everyone else overseas from the United States.  Africa is were God started with Adam and Eve and as you should know The Garden of Eden was located in Assyria by Africa.  From Adam and Eve the rest of us and it only make sense because people had to learn to adjust to colder climates over time. 
Jesus is in the bloodline of Abraham in the Old Testament up to the New Testament.  Virgin Mary was called by the Lord to be the mother of Jesus Christ and Mary and Joseph were married prior to his marriage.  After Jesus birth Mary and Joseph had other children who were JAMES, JOSES, JUDA AND SIMON    -- Mathew 13:53-55   AND   Mark 6 : 1-6     breaks it down a little.  Elizabeth was Mary's cousin and Elizabeth was married to Zechariah and they were the parents of John the Baptist who Baptist Christ.
Joseph, (Jesus brother Joses) of Arimathea, noble and honorable in rank and a respected member of the council (Sanhedrin), who was himself waiting for the kingdom of God, daring the consequences, took courage and ventured to go to Pilate and asked for the body of Jesus. 
Britain is where Joseph spent spreading the gospel of Jesus Christ.  Legends about the arrival of Christianity in Britain abounded during the middle Ages. Early writers do not connect Joseph to this activity, however. Tertullian (AD 155–222) wrote in Adversus Judaeos that Britain had already received and accepted the Gospel in his lifetime.  The first literary connection of Joseph of Arimathea with Britain had to wait for the ninth-century Life of Mary Magdalene attributed to Rabanus Maurus (AD 766–856), Archbishop of Mainz, however, the earliest authentic copy of the Maurus text is one housed in the Bodleian Library of Oxford University.   Rabanus states that Joseph of Arimathea was sent to Britain, and he goes on to detail who travelled with him as far as France, claiming that he was accompanied by "the two Bethany sisters, Mary and Martha, Lazarus (who was raised from the dead), St. Eutropius, St. Salome, St. Cleon, St. Saturnius, St. Mary Magdalen, Marcella (the maid of the Bethany sisters), St. Maxium or Maximin, St. Martial, and St. Trophimus or Restitutus.  Rabanus Maurus describes their voyage to Britain. 

GOING BACK A LITTLE
Tribe of Ephraim  was one of the Tribes of Israel.  The descendants of Joseph formed two of the tribes of Israel, whereas each of the other sons of Jacob was the founder of only one tribe. Thus there were in reality thirteen tribes; but the number twelve was preserved by excluding that of Levi when Ephraim and Manasseh are mentioned separately. (Num 1:32-34; Josh 17:14,17; 1 Chr 7:20)
From after the conquest of Canaan by Joshua, who himself was a descendent of Ephraim (1 Chronicles 7:20-27), in c. 1200 BCE, until the formation of the first Kingdom of Israel in c. 1050 BC, the Tribe of Ephraim was a part of a loose confederation of Israelite tribes. No central government existed, and in times of crisis the people were led by ad hoc leaders known as Judges. (see the Book of Judges) With the growth of the threat from Philistine incursions, the Israelite tribes decided to form a strong centralised monarchy to meet the challenge, and the Tribe of Ephraim joined the new kingdom with Saul as the first king. After the death of Saul, all the tribes other than Judah remained loyal to the House of Saul, but after the death of Ish-bosheth, Saul's son and successor to the throne of Israel, the Tribe of Ephraim joined the other northern Israelite tribes in making David, who was then the king of Judah, king of a re-united Kingdom of Israel.
However, on the accession of Rehoboam, David's grandson, in c. 930 BC the northern tribes split from the House of David to reform a Kingdom of Israel as the Northern Kingdom. The first king of the Northern Kingdom of Israel was Jeroboam, who came from the Tribe of Ephraim. (1 Kings 11:26)
The accents of the tribes were distinctive enough even at the time of the confederacy so that when the Israelites of Gilead, under the leadership of Jephthah, fought the Tribe of Ephraim, their pronunciation of shibboleth as sibboleth was considered sufficient evidence to single out individuals from Ephraim, so that they could be subjected to immediate death by the Israelites of Gilead.
The Ten Lost Tribes of Israel refers to those tribes of ancient Israel that formed the Kingdom of Israel and which disappeared from Biblical and all other historical accounts after the kingdom was destroyed in about 720 BC by ancient Assyria.  Many groups have traditions concerning the continued hidden existence or future public return of these tribes. 
British Israelism is a faith and is the belief that people of Western European descent, particularly those in Great Britain, are the direct lineal descendants of the Ten Lost Tribes of Israel.  There has never been a single head or an organisational structure to the movement. However, various British Israelite organisations were set up across the British Commonwealth and America from the 1870s, and many still continue to exist.  Adherents may hold a diverse set of beliefs and claims that are ancillary to the core genealogical theory, however there are central tenets all British Israelites follow, including Two House Theology which is the core essence of British Israelism.  A central teaching of the British Israelites Two House Theology is that while Jews are considered to be Israelites, not all Israelites are considered to be Jews.  British Israelites believe that Jews descend only from Judah (and the tribe of Benjamin), while the House of Israel they believe are the White British or Anglo-Saxon-Celtic kindred peoples of North-Western Europe today.
The Tribes listed in the bible are   -  Reuben / Simeon / Levi / Judah / Dan / Naphtali / Gad / Asher / Issachar / Zebulun / Joseph / Manasseh / Ephraim / Benjamin

CONTINUING   
My family moved north and settled along the British coast.  The above information can help you keep track of and following this information I will get right into some of my family members in the past who many people are familiar with.  

BRITAIN - THE BRITISH ISLES.  At the end of the last ice age, what are now the British Isles were joined to the European mainland as a mass of land extending north west from the modern-day northern coastline of France, Belgium and the Netherlands. Ice covered almost all of what is now Ireland and Great Britain with the exception of most of modern-day Munster and much of what we now call England. Between 14,000 to 10,000 years ago, as the ice melted, sea levels rose separating Ireland from the mainland and also creating the Isle of Man. About two to four millennia later, Great Britain became separated from the mainland. Britain probably became repopulated with people before the ice age ended and certainly before it became separated from the mainland. It is likely that Ireland became settled by sea after it had already become an island.
At the time of the Roman Empire, about two thousand years ago, various tribes were inhabiting the islands. The Romans expanded their civilisation to control southern Great Britain but were impeded in advancing any further, building Hadrian's Wall to mark the northern frontier of their empire in 122 AD. At that time, Ireland was populated by a people known as Scots, the northern part of Great Britain by a people known as Picts and the southern half by Britons. Anglo-Saxons arrived as Roman power waned in the 5th century AD. Initially, their arrival seems to have been at the invitation of the Britons as mercenaries to repulse incursions by the Scots and Picts. In time, Anglo-Saxon demands on the British became so great that they came to culturally dominate the bulk of southern Great Britain, though recent genetic evidence suggests Britons still formed the bulk of the population. This dominance creating what is now England and leaving culturally British enclaves only in the north of what is now England, in Cornwall and what is now known as Wales. Ireland had been unaffected by the Romans except, significantly, having been Christianised, traditionally by the Romano-Brition, Saint Patrick. As Europe, including Britain descended turmoil following in the collapse of Roman civilisation, an era known as the Dark Ages, Ireland entering a golden age and responded with missions, first to Great Britain and then to the continent, founding monasteries and universities and were later joined by Anglo-Saxon missions of the same nature.
Viking invasions began in the 9th century, followed by more permanent settlements, particularly along the east coast of Ireland, the west coast of modern-day Scotland and the Isle of Man. Though the Vikings were eventually neutralised in Ireland, their influence remained in the cities of Dublin, Cork, Limerick, Waterford and Wexford. England however was slowly conquered around the turn of the first millennium AD, and eventually became a feudal possession of Denmark. The relations between the descendants of Vikings in England and counterparts in Normandy, in northern France, lay at the heart of a series of events that led to the Norman conquest of England in 1066. The remnants of the Duchy of Normandy, which conquered England, remain associated to the English Crown as the Channel Islands to this day. A century later the marriage of the future Henry II of England to Eleanor of Aquitaine created the Angevin Empire, partially under the French Crown. At the invitation of a provincial king and under the authority of Pope Adrian IV (the only Englishman to be elected pope), the Angevins invaded Ireland in 1169. Though initially intended to be kept as an independent kingdom, the failure of the Irish High King to ensure the terms of the Treaty of Windsor led Henry II, as King of England, to rule as effective monarch under the title of Lord of Ireland. This title was granted to his younger son but when Henry's heir unexpectedly died the title of King of England and Lord of Ireland became entwined in one person.
By the Late Middle Ages, Great Britain was separated into the Kingdoms of England and Scotland. Power in Ireland fluxed between Gaelic kingdoms, Hiberno-Norman lords and the English-dominated Lordship of Ireland. A similar situation existed in the Principality of Wales, which was slowly being annexed into the Kingdom of England by a series of laws. During the course of the 15th century, the Crown of England would assert a claim to the Crown of France, thereby also releasing the King of England as from being vassal of the King of France. In 1534, King Henry VIII, at first having been a strong defender of Roman Catholicism in the face of the Reformation, separated from the Roman Church after failing to secure a divorce from the Pope. His response was to place the King of England as "the only Supreme Head in Earth of the Church of England", thereby removing the authority of the Pope from the affairs of the English Church. Ireland, which had been held by the King of England as Lord of Ireland, but which strictly speaking had been a feudal possession of the Pope since the Norman invasion invasion was declared a separate kingdom in personal union with England.
Scotland, meanwhile had remained an independent Kingdom. In 1603, that changed when the King of Scotland inherited the Crown of England, and consequently the Crown of Ireland also. The subsequent 17th century was one of political upheaval, religious division and war. English colonialism in Ireland of the 16th century was extended by large-scale Scottish and English colonies in Ulster. Religious division heightened and the King in England came into conflict with parliament. A prime issue was, inter alia, over his policy of tolerance towards Catholicism. The resulting English Civil War or War of the Three Kingdoms led to a revolutionary republic in England. Ireland, largely Catholic was mainly loyal to the king. Following defeat to the parliaments army, large scale land distributions from loyalist Irish nobility to English commoners in the service of the parliamentary army created the beginnings a new Ascendancy class which over the next hundred years would obliterated the English (Hiberno-Norman) and Gaelic Irish nobility in Ireland. The new class was Protestant and British the common people were, largely Catholic and Irish. This theme would influence Irish politics for centuries to come. When the monarchy was restored in England, the king found it politically impossible to restore all the lands of former land-owners in Ireland. The "Glorious Revolution" of 1688 repeated similar themes: a Catholic king pushing for religious tolerance in opposition to a Protestant parliament in England. The king's army was defeated at the Battle of the Boyne and at the militarily crucial Battle of Aughrim in Ireland. Resistance held out, and a guarantee of religious tolerance was a cornerstone of the Treaty of Limerick. However, in the evolving political climate, the terms of Limerick were superseded, a new monarchy was installed, and the new Irish parliament was packed with the new elite which legislated increasing intolerant Penal Laws, which discommoded both Dissenters and Catholics.
The Kingdoms of England and Scotland were unified in 1707 creating the Kingdom of Great Britain. Following an attempted republican revolution in Ireland in 1798, the Kingdoms of Ireland and Great Britain were unified in 1801, creating the United Kingdom. The Isle of Man and the Channel Islands remaining outside of the United Kingdom but with their ultimate good governance being the responsibility of the British Crown (effectively the British government). Although, the colonies of North American that would become the United States of America were lost by the start of the 19th century, the British Empire expanded rapidly elsewhere. A century later it would cover one third of the globe. Poverty in Ireland remained desperate however and industrialisation in England led to terrible condition for the working class. Mass migrations following the Irish Famine and Highland Clearances resulted in the distribution of the islands' population and culture throughout the world and a rapid de-population of Ireland in the second-half of the 19th century. Most of Ireland seceded from the United Kingdom after the Irish War of Independence and the subsequent Anglo-Irish Treaty (1919–1922), with the six counties that formed Northern Ireland remaining as an autonomous region of the UK.
The British Empire comprised the dominions, colonies, protectorates, mandates and other territories ruled or administered by the United Kingdom. It originated with the overseas colonies and trading posts established by England in the late 16th and early 17th centuries. At its height it was the largest empire in history and, for over a century, was the foremost global power.  By 1922 the British Empire held sway over about 458 million people, one-quarter of the world's population at the time, and covered more than 33,700,000 km2 (13,012,000 sq mi), almost a quarter of the Earth's total land area. As a result, its political, linguistic and cultural legacy is widespread. At the peak of its power, it was often said that "the sun never sets on the British Empire" because its span across the globe ensured that the Sun was always shining on at least one of its numerous territories.
As mentioned above is as followed - Crown colony, also known in the 17th century as a royal colony, was a type of colonial administration of the English and later British Empire.
Crown, or royal, colonies were ruled by a governor appointed at first by the Monarch and later by the Secretary of State for the Colonies.  Under the name of "royal colony", the first of what would later become known as Crown colonies was the English Colony of Virginia in the present-day United States, after the Crown took control from the Virginia Company in 1624.
Until the mid-nineteenth century, the term "Crown colony" was primarily used to refer to those colonies which had been acquired through wars, such as Trinidad and Tobago and British Guiana, but after that time it was more broadly applied to any colony other than the Presidencies and provinces of British India and the colonies of settlement, such as The Canadas, Newfoundland, New South Wales, Queensland, South Australia, Tasmania, Victoria, Western Australia, and New Zealand, later to become the Dominions.
The term continued to be used up until 1981, when the British Nationality Act 1981 reclassified the remaining British colonies as "British Dependent Territories". From 2002 they have been known as British Overseas Territories.
The Virginia Company refers collectively to a pair of English joint stock companies chartered by James I on 10 April 1606 with the purposes of establishing settlements on the coast of North America.  The two companies, called the "Virginia Company of London" (or the London Company) and the "Virginia Company of Plymouth" (or Plymouth Company) operated with identical charters but with differing territories. An area of overlapping territory was created within which the two companies were not permitted to establish colonies within one hundred miles of each other. The Plymouth Company never fulfilled its charter, and its territory that later became New England was at that time also claimed by France.
Jamestown (or James Towne or Jamestowne) was a settlement in the Colony of Virginia. Established by the Virginia Company of London as "James Fort" on May 14, 1607, it was the first permanent English settlement in what is now the United States, following several earlier failed attempts, including the Lost Colony of Roanoke. It would serve as capital of the colony for 83 years (from 1616 until 1699).
British colonization of the Americas (including colonization by both the Kingdom of England and the Kingdom of Scotland before the Acts of Union which created the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1707) began in 1607 in Jamestown, Virginia and reached its peak when colonies had been established throughout the Americas. The English, and later the British, were among the most important colonizers of the Americas, and their American empire came to rival the Spanish American colonies in military and economic might.
This English, Scottish, and British colonization caused dramatic upheaval among the indigenous civilizations in the Americas, both directly through the use of imported military force and indirectly through cultural disruption and introduced diseases. Relations between the colonists and natives varied from constructive trade to armed conflict. Many of the indigenous societies had developed a warrior class and had a long history of warfare. The rapidity, silence, and ferocity of their war parties proved devastating against the colonial style of waging war, but the colonials generally emerged successful in the long term. Like the French, trade with the natives was an important part of English and British colonial policy, but they also heavily promoted settlement and development.
Three types of colonies existed in the British Empire in America during the height of its power in the eighteenth century. These were charter colonies, proprietary colonies and royal colonies. After the American War of Independence, British territories in the Americas were granted more responsible government until they were gradually granted independence in the twentieth century. In this way, two countries in North America, ten in the Caribbean, and one in South America have received their independence from the United Kingdom. Today, the United Kingdom retains eight overseas territories in the Americas, which it grants varying degrees of self-government. In addition, nine former British possessions in the Americas, which are now independent of the United Kingdom, are Commonwealth Realms.




Sunday, October 30, 2011

RESOURCES  -- DOINGGOODBUSINESSAS


https://docs.google.com/document/d/1zCJAqLsLioxXqT8yZYM_en6fczcUKuO1zLDmKqTqr58/edit


AUTO TIPS 


https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B6q3Ftla-ub9MjA3OTE5MjItNGI1NC00MzIwLWE3MzUtYTk5NzhmYjQ1MGNj



YOUTH VIOLENCE 


https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B6q3Ftla-ub9YzJjYjA0NDMtMjY5Mi00ZDY3LTllMmMtYzg1MWRlYWQzZGYx


WAYS TO SAVE MONEY


https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B6q3Ftla-ub9MzM2MzJmYTEtYTc5OS00M2U5LWIwYjEtNWY3YTdhZjlkZGEz



UNDERSTAND REAL ESTATE    

https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B6q3Ftla-ub9N2MwMmYzNWEtZDk4Mi00Y2I3LTkzMzQtNmIwYTIzZGQ5YWUw




UNDERSTAND VOLUNTEERING 


https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B6q3Ftla-ub9MzJiMDJjMjYtN2FkYy00MGE0LWE3ZWItNGQwMTdhNGFiN2Fi



PROTECTING CHILDRENS PRIVACY   

https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B6q3Ftla-ub9NGEzMDAwY2ItMDUxZi00NDVjLWFmNWItMGVhNWMxYzlkYWYw




PLANNING AGAINST A BUSINESS FAILURE
  




SELL YOUR HOME CONSIDER THESE 90 WAYS


https://docs.google.com/open?id=0B6q3Ftla-ub9NGEzMDAwY2ItMDUxZi00NDVjLWFmNWItMGVhNWMxYzlkYWYw



GED MATERIALS





READING SKILLS


SOCIAL STUDIES AND SCIENCE


LANGUAGE ARTS STANDARDS


MATH NUMBER SENSE


GED PROBLEM SOLVING


GED MATH INFORMATION


PERFACE


GED PRACTICE TEST


GED TIPS LANGUAGE ARTS AND READING


GED MATERIALS


LANGUAGE ARTS AND WRITING


COLLEGE PREPARATION PRACTICE


STUDY GUIDE BOOK


SPIRITUAL RESOURCES


KING JAMES VERSION OF THE BIBLE





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GENESIS    //   EXODUS   //  LEVITICUS  //  NUMBERS  //  DEUTERONOMY







PHOTOS OF ME AND FAMILY MEMBERS WHO HAVE PASSED















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Tuesday, April 26, 2011

Wednesday, November 17, 2010

Doing good business as

DOING GOOD BUSINESS AS  
..
ONLINE TV STATION  
WRITE UP ON - BUS SHOW 1 ON BUSINESS - MEDIA ,OWNER AND POLITICS . https://docs.google.com/document/pub?id=1PF2fYvyK2pRum0JS1xcSvKuz7p4h4cQFtObK9rgA3Rc .
Fhttp://www.youtube.com/doinggoodbusinessas  -  CLICK HERE TO GO BACK TO -   HOME
DOING GOOD BUSINESS
Attract and/or improve relationships
Attract, nurture, and maintain strong, loving, rich, and satisfying relationships. Discover the secrets of solving people problems and healing interpersonal wounds.
Resolve personal and professional conflicts with others. Improve the quality of all relationships. Interact with others in healthy and positive ways. Attract loving, supportive individuals. Enjoy the rapturous love life of your dreams.
Human beings are meant to relate to each other.
TEAMWORK  IS THE BEST AND MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO SUCCEED IN LIFE AND DO GOOD BUSINESS.
HAS A LOT TO WITH THE FOLLOWING
RESPECT FOR
Work ethic is a set of values based on hard work and diligence.
It is also a belief in the moral benefit of work and its ability
to enhance character. An example would be the Protestant work ethic.
A work ethic may include being reliable, having initiative, or
maintaining social skills.
Workers exhibiting a good work ethic in theory (and ideally
in practice) should be selected for better positions, more
responsibility and ultimately promotion. Workers who fail to
exhibit a good work ethic may be regarded as failing to provide
fair value for the wage the employer is paying them and should
not be promoted or placed in positions of greater responsibility.
Accounting
List of accounting topics
Advertising
Banking
Big business
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List of business ethics, political economy, and philosophy of business topics
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List of business law topics
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List of economics topics
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List of finance topics
Franchising
Government ownership
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List of human resource management topics
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List of oldest companies
Management
List of management topics
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List of information technology management topics
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List of production topics
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List of marketing topics
Money
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List of real estate topics
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Strategic Management
Strategic Planning
_____________________________________________________________________________
Company · Business
Company forms
Sole proprietorship
Partnership
(General · Limited · LLP)
Corporation
Cooperative
United States
S corporation · C corporation
LLC · LLLP · Series LLC
Delaware corporation
Nevada corporation
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Limited company
(by shares · by guarantee
Public · Proprietary)
Unlimited company
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European Union / EEA
SE · SCE · SPE · EEIG
Elsewhere
AB · AG · ANS · A/S · AS · GmbH
K.K. · N.V. · Oy · S.A. · more
Doctrines
Corporate governance
Limited liability · Ultra vires
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corporation by estoppel
Piercing the corporate veil
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Related areas
Contract · Civil procedure
v • d • e
A business (also known as company, enterprise, or firm)
is a legally recognized organization designed to provide
goods, services, or both to consumers or tertiary business
in exchange for money.[1] Businesses are predominant in
capitalist economies, in which most businesses are privately
owned and typically formed to earn profit that will increase
the wealth of its owners. The owners and operators of private,
for-profit businesses have as one of their main objectives the
receipt or generation of a financial return in exchange for
work and acceptance of risk. Businesses can also be formed
not-for-profit or be state-owned.
The etymology of "business" relates to the state of being
busy either as an individual or society as a whole, doing
commercially viable and profitable work. The term "business" has at
least three usages, depending on the scope — the singular usage
(above) to mean a particular company or corporation, the generalized
usage to refer to a particular market sector, such as "the music business"
and compound forms such as agribusiness, or the broadest meaning to
include all activity by the community of suppliers of goods and services.
However, the exact definition of business, like much else in the
philosophy of business, is a matter of debate and complexity of meanings.
Contents
1 Basic forms of ownership
2 Classifications
3 Management
3.1 Reforming State Enterprises
4 Organization and government regulation
4.1 Commercial law
4.2 Capital
4.3 Intellectual property
4.4 Exit plans
5 See also
6 Notes and references
7 External links
Basic forms of ownership
See also: Types of business entity
Although forms of business ownership vary by jurisdiction, there are several common forms:
Sole proprietorship: A sole proprietorship is a business owned by one person.
The owner may operate on his or her own or may employ others. The owner of the
business has unlimited liability of the debts incurred by the business.
Partnership: A form of business owned by two or more people. In most forms of
partnerships,
each partner has unlimited liability of the debts incurred by the business.
There are three typical classifications of partnerships: general partnerships,
limited partnerships, and limited liability
_____________________________________________________________________________
Basic forms of ownership
See also: Types of business entity
Although forms of business ownership vary by jurisdiction, there are several common forms:
Sole proprietorship: A sole proprietorship is a business owned by one person.
The owner may operate on his or her own or may employ others. The owner of the business
has unlimited liability of the debts incurred by the business.
Partnership: A form of business owned by two or more people. In most forms of partnerships,
each partner has unlimited liability of the debts incurred by the business.
here are three typical classifications of partnerships: general partnerships,
limited partnerships, and limited liability partnerships.
Corporation: A limited liability entity that has a separate legal personality from its
members. Corporations can be either privately-owned or government-owned, and can be
organized as either for-profit or not-for-profit. A privately-owned corporation is
owned by private individuals while a public corporation is owned by multiple shareholders
and is overseen by a board of directors, which hires the business's managerial staff.
Cooperative: Often referred to as a "co-op", a cooperative is a limited liability entity
that can organize for-profit or not-for-profit. A for-profit cooperative differs from a
for-profit corporation in that it has members, as opposed to shareholders, who share
decision-making authority. Cooperatives are typically classified as either consumer
cooperatives or worker cooperatives. Cooperatives are fundamental to the ideology of
economic democracy.
______________________________________________________________________________
Employment
Classifications Casual/Contingent
• Full-time • Part-time • Self-employed/Independent contractor • Temporary • Wage labour
Hiring Employment counsellor
• Application • Background Check • Cover letter • Drug testing • Contract • Interview • Job hunting • Job fraud • Probation • Referral • Recruiter (Employment agency • Executive search) • Résumé/Curriculum Vitæ (CV) • Work-at-home scheme
Roles Internship
• Job • Numerary • Permanent • Permatemp • Supernumerary • Supervisor • Volunteer
Attendance Break
• Career break • Furlough • Gap year • Leave of absence • Long service leave • No call, no show • Sabbatical • Sick leave
Schedules 35-hour workweek
• Eight-hour day • Flextime plan • Four-day week • Overtime • Retroactive overtime • Shift work • Telecommuting • Workweek • Working time
Wages Living wage • Maximum wage • Minimum wage (Canada, USA, Hong Kong) • Overtime rate • Paid time off • Performance-related pay • Salary • Salary cap • Working poor
Benefits Annual leave • Sick leave • Parental leave • Health insurance • Life insurance • Disability insurance • Take-home vehicle
Health & safety Epilepsy and employment • Ergonomics • Industrial injury • Occupational disease • Occupational exposure limit • Occupational health psychology • Sick building syndrome • Work accident (Occupational fatality) • Workplace noise • Workplace stress • Workplace wellness • Work-life balance • Workers' compensation
Equality Affirmative action • Equal pay for women
Infractions Employee handbook • Evaluation • Labour law • Sexual harassment • Sleeping while on duty • Workplace bullying • Workplace surveillance
Willingness Anti-work • Job satisfaction • Refusal of work • Workaholic • Work aversion • Work ethic • Wage slavery
Termination At-will employment • Constructive dismissal • Dismissal • Layoff • Letter of resignation • Resignation • Retirement • Severance package • Types of unemployment • Unemployment • Unemployment benefits • Wrongful dismissal
Miscellaneous Dead end job • Overqualification • Recession-proof job • Underemployment • Unemployment rates
___________________________________________________________________________
Politics , is a process by which groups of people make collective decisions. The term is generally applied to behavior within civil governments, but politics has been observed in other group interactions, including corporate, academic, and religious institutions. It consists of "social relations involving authority or power" and refers to the regulation of a political unit, and to the methods and tactics used to formulate and apply policy.
History
The origin and development of government institutions is the most visible subject for the study of Politics and its history.
Basic forms of political systems
The following are examples of political systems, some of which are typically mutually exclusive Monarchy and Republic), while others may (or may not) overlap in various combinations
( Democracy and Westminster system, Democracy and Socialism).
Anarchism (Rule by all/no one)
Democracy (Rule by majority)
Monarchy. (Rule by monarch) Monarchies are one of the oldest political systems known, developing from tribal structure with one person the absolute ruler.
Meritocracy (Rule by best)
Technocracy (Rule by scientist/intellectuals)
Republic. (rule by law) The first recorded republic was in India in the 6th century BC.
Sultanates. (Rule by Allah) an Islamic political structure combining aspects of Monarchy and Theocracy.
Islamic Democracy. (Rule by majority in Islamic context) an Islamic and democratic political structure, which combines aspects of Theocracy (as the framework) and Democracy (as the decision making method under Islam's ethical system). Iran's constitution is based on such a system.
Theocracy (Rule by alleged representative of God)
Westminster system (rule by republic and representative democracy through parliament)
Feudalism (Rule by lord/king)
IT IS IMPORTANT TO INFORM AND HELP PEOPLE UNDERSTAND - PLEASE REGISTER TO VOTE
An election is a formal decision-making process by which a population chooses an individual to hold public office. Elections have been the usual mechanism by which modern representative democracy operates since the 17th century. ] Elections may fill offices in the legislature, sometimes in the executive and judiciary, and for regional and local government. This process is also used in many other private and business organizations, from clubs to voluntary associations and corporations.
The universal use of elections as a tool for selecting representatives in modern democracies is in contrast with the practice in the democratic archetype, ancient Athens. Elections were considered an oligarchic institution and most political offices were filled using sortition, also known as allotment, by which officeholders were chosen by lot.
Electoral reform describes the process of introducing fair electoral systems where they are not in place, or improving the fairness or effectiveness of existing systems. Psephology is the study of results and other statistics relating to elections (especially with a view to predicting future results).
To elect means "to choose or make a decision"(For example, in contract law, if one party breaches the agreement, the other party may "elect" whether to continue or repudiate the contract), and so sometimes other forms of ballot such as the referendum are referred to as elections, especially in the United States.
A constitution is a set of laws that a set of people have made and agreed upon for government—often as a written document—that enumerates and limits the powers and functions of a political entity. These rules together make up, i.e. constitute, what the entity is. In the case of countries and autonomous regions of federal countries the term refers specifically to a constitution defining the fundamental political principles, and establishing the structure, procedures, powers and duties, of a government. By limiting the government's own reach, most constitutions guarantee certain rights to the people. The term constitution can be applied to any overall system of law that defines the functioning of a government, including several uncodified historical constitutions that existed before the development of modern codified constitutions.
Constitutions concern different levels of political organization. They exist at national ( codified Indian Constitution, uncodified Constitution of the United Kingdom), regional (the Massachusetts Constitution), and sometimes lower levels. They also define many political and other groups, such as political parties, pressure groups, and trade unions. A supranational constitution is possible (proposed European Union constitution) but not always probable, depending on the structure of government to be laid out. The traditional absolute sovereignty of modern nations assumed in a constitution is often limited by binding international treaties such as the American Convention on Human Rights which binds the 24 American countries that have ratified it, and the European Convention on Human Rights which binds the 47 member countries of the Council of Europe.
Non-political entities such as corporations and voluntary associations, whether incorporated or not, often have what is effectively a constitution, often called memorandum and articles of association (U.S. incorporation).
The Constitution of India is the longest written constitution of any sovereign country in the world, containing 395 articles, 12 schedules and 94 amendments, with 117,369 words in its English language version, while the United States Constitution is the shortest written constitution.
     
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